Exodontia.Info
Mouth-Sinus Communications -
How to Lessen the Risks
If you have had an upper premolar or molar tooth
removed, there is a small risk that a communication
between the mouth and sinus may develop.

You may not be aware of this for several weeks (it can
develop as late as 4 – 6 weeks after the extraction).  It
will often manifest itself as a discharge of fluid from the
nose after drinking, possible discharge of pus from the
nose, acute and chronic
sinusitis and a foul taste in the
mouth and smell in the nose.

To minimise the risk of developing this communication
between the mouth and sinus,


YOU SHOULD NOT:

  • Smoke (this slows the healing of the extraction socket
    and makes you more likely to develop an infection in
    the socket which increases the risk of developing the
    mouth-sinus communication) for at least 72 hours.

  • Blow your nose or forcefully sneeze (this increases
    the pressure within the sinus and increases the risk of
    developing the mouth-sinus communication).

  • Use straws or whistle for the next 72 hours

  • Go flying for the next 4 – 6 weeks (the cabin is
    pressurised and this increases the risk of developing
    the mouth-sinus communication).


YOU SHOULD:

  • Use nasal decongestants (such as Ephedrine nasal
    drops, Oxymetazoline & Xylometazoline) as this
    reduces the degree of swelling of the nasal lining and
    lessens the likelihood of sneezing.

  • Use steam inhalations augmented with  Karvol or
    Olbas oil.

  • Use an antiseptic mouth-wash (such as Corsodyl) as
    this lessens the likelihood of infection and speeds
    healing.

  • Sneeze with your mouth open as this lowers the
    pressure within the sinus and lessens the likelihood of
    raised pressure creating the mouth-sinus
    communication.

  • Take the antibiotics and finish the course                  
    (if prescribed).
Last Updated 5th September 2017